Laxaro

View the latest news and breaking news today

Phys.org

Read Latest News Article in Phys.org.



us approves land exchange for road through alaska refuge

interior secretary ryan zinke signed a land trade agreement monday that could lead to construction of a ro...




separation line

for patients in need of blood, it's fatally important that they receive the right type. that's why doctors will often give emergency room patients universal donor blood, rather than waiting for the results of a blood test. blood tests take a long time to proc...




amazon opens store with no cashiers, lines or registers

no cashiers, no lines, no registers—this is h...




marine vegetation can mitigate ocean acidification, study finds

marine plants and seaweeds in shallow coastal ecosystems can play a key role in alleviating the effects of ocean acidification, and their robust pop...




the role of cranial modification in identity formation

before the expansion of the inka empire, the late intermediate period was marked by political upheaval and the emergence of new cultural practices. in "ethnogenesis and social difference in the andean late intermediate period (ad 1100-1450): a bioarchaeological study of cranial modification in the colca valley, peru," published in current ant...




emissions of volatile organic compounds higher than previously assumed

in the scientific journal pnas, researchers from innsbruck, austria, present the world's first chemical fingerprint of urban emission sources of volatile organic compounds (vocs). accordingly, the abatement...




industry conservation ethic proves critical to gulf of maine lobster fishery

example of an egg-bearing lobster. credit: gulf of maine research institutea new study, led by scientists at the gulf of maine research institute and colleagues at the university of maine and noaa, demonstrates how conservation practices championed by maine lobstermen help make the lobster fishery resilient to climate change. for generations, lobstermen in maine have returned large lobsters to the sea and have designed a special way of marking egg-bearing lobsters to give them further protection. this conservation culture distinguishes the gulf of maine fishery from southern new england, where fishermen have not historically taken the same steps to preserve large, reproductive lobsters.the study, funded by the national science foundation a...




discrepancies between satellite and global model estimates of land water storage

mouths of the amazon river in brazil. credit: nasaresearch led by the university of texas at austin has found that calculations of water storage in many river basins from commonly used global computer models differ markedly from independent storage estimates from grace satellites. the findings, published in the proceedings of the national academy of sciences on jan. 22, raise questions about global models that have been used in recent years to help assess water resources and potentially influence management decisions.the study used measurements from grace satellites from 2002 to 2014 to determine water storage changes in 186 river basins around the world and compared the results with simulations made by seven commonly used models.the gra...




climate change and snowmelt—turn up the heat, but what about humidity?

credit: cc0 public domainit's said on sticky summer days: "it's not the heat, it's the humidity." that holds true in the winter too, and could hold the key to the future of snowpack and water resources in the american west. in a new study published today in proceedings of the national academy of sciences, university of utah professor paul brooks and university of nevada reno professor adrian harpold show that changes in humidity may determine how the contribution of snowpack to streams, lakes and groundwater changes as the climate warms. surprisingly, cloudy, gray and humid winter days can actually cause the snowpack to warm faster, increasing the likelihood of melt during winter months when the snowpack should be growing, the authors...




a better hiv test

cheng-ting "jason" tsai, a graduate student in the lab of carolyn bertozzi, and peter robinson, a former graduate student of bertozzi's, in 2016, work on an earlier version of their test. credit: l.a. ciceropublic health officials have a tough choice to make when it comes to screening people for hiv: administer a reliable blood test that can detect infections early on, but that few people will volunteer for, or give people a convenient test using saliva that is less reliable during the first stages of infection. a new test could change that. developed by stanford chemists in collaboration with the alameda county public health laboratory, the test combines the convenience of spitting in a cup with the reliability of blood tests, they re...




deep dive into the 3-d structures of proteins reveals key building blocks

rutgers researchers identified a small set of simple protein building blocks (left) that likely existed at the earliest stages of life's history. over billions of years, these 'legos of life' were assembled and repurposed by evolution into complex proteins (right) that are at the core of modern metabolism. credit: vikas nanda/rutgers robert wood johnson medical schoolrutgers scientists have found the "legos of life" - four core chemical structures that can be stacked together to build the myriad proteins inside every organism - after smashing and dissecting nearly 10,000 proteins to understand their component parts. the four building blocks make energy available for humans and all other living organisms, according to a study published ...




new research holds promise of predicting snowpack even before the snow falls

frank gehrke, left, of the california department of water resources, measures snow levels in the mountains of el dorado county, california. new noaa research shows the potential to predict snow levels a season in advance. credit: john chacon / california department of water resources.as farmers in the american west decide what, when and where to plant, and urban water managers plan for water needs in the next year, they want to know how much water their community will get from melting snow in the mountains. this melting snow comes from snowpack, the high elevation reservoir of snow which melts in the spring and summer. agriculture depends on snowpack for a majority of its water. meltwater also contributes to municipal water supply; feeds ...




global temperature targets will be missed within decades unless carbon emissions reversed: new study

new projections by researchers from the universities of southampton and liverpool, and the australian national university in canberra, could be the catalyst th...




puzzling finding raises new questions about atmospheric physics of giant planets

the hottest point on a gaseous planet near a distant star isn't where astrophysicists expected it to be - a discover...




scientists discover material ideal for smart photovoltaic windows

smart windows that are transparent when it's dark or cool but automatically darken when the sun is too bright are increasingly popular energy-saving devices. but imagine that when the window is darkened, it simultaneously produces electricity. such ...




user experiment at bessy ii—complex tessellations, extraordinary materials

an international team of researchers lead by the technical university of munich (tum) has discovered a reaction path that produces exotic layers with semiregular structures. these kinds of materials are interesting because they frequently p...




new caledonian crows extract prey faster with complex hooked tools

biologists at the universities of st andrews and edinburgh have discove...




climate engineering, once started, would have severe impacts if stopped

facing a climate crisis, we may someday spray sulfur dioxide into the upper atmosphere to form a cloud that cools the earth, but suddenly stopping the spraying wo...




engineers design artificial synapse for 'brain-on-a-chip' hardware

from left: mit researchers scott h. tan, jeehwan kim, and shinhyun choi credit: kuan qiaowhen it comes to processing power, the human brain just can't be beat. packed within the squishy, football-sized organ are somewhere around 100 billion neurons. at any given moment, a single neuron can relay instructions to thousands of other neurons via synapses—the spaces between neurons, across which neurotransmitters are exchanged. there are more than 100 trillion synapses that mediate neuron signaling in the brain, strengthening some connections while pruning others, in a process that enables the brain to recognize patterns, remember facts, and carry out other learning tasks, at lightning speeds.researchers in the emerging field of "neuromorp...




new for three types of extreme-energy space particles: theory shows unified origin

this image illustrates the 'multi-messenger' emission from a gigantic reservoir of cosmic rays that are accelerated by powerful jets from a supermassive black hole. the high-energy cosmic rays escaping from the black hole's active galactic nucleus are trapped in the magnetized environment that serves as a reservoir of cosmic rays. the high-energy neutrinos and gamma rays are produced in the magnetized environment during their confinement and in the intergalactic space during their propagation. the ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays, high-energy neutrinos, and gamma rays eventually reach the earth, where they can give us a unified picture of all three cumulative fluxes of the cosmic particles. credit: kanoko horionew model connects the origins ...